The Toronto Necropolis – Fascinating Architectural Gem in Cabbagetown

Weenen-photo-NecropolisContributed by Kathy Flaxman. Cabbagetown boasts a stunning collection of homes, many from the Victorian era. However, there are also historically notable public spaces and buildings including a cemetery – the Toronto Necropolis! Gilles Huot, co-chair of the Cabbagetown Preservation Association regularly conducts walking tours of the Necropolis. “I love history and I find the history of Toronto and Cabbagetown fascinating,” Gilles says.” I’ve been living here for over 12 years and I’m happy to be able to help make it even more special.”

 
Visitors from as far away as Jersey UK, having read about the Necropolis, are anxious to see it. Gilles points out that the buildings and monuments are outstanding. “The buildings including chapel and porte-cochère were opened in 1872. Renowned Toronto architect Henry Langley designed them. He’s also buried in the Necropolis,” he says. Patricia McHugh in her book, Toronto Architecture, concurs, stating: “Hugh Langley’s High Victorian Gothic mortuary chapel is one of the city’s unspoiled architectural treasures, with its complicated tracery and bargeboards, finials and ironwork.”

 
Visitors to the Cemetery also have the opportunity to look for Victorian symbolism.  “Many monuments are topped by an urn with veil. The veil could represent a shroud or the “veil” between the world of the living and the one of the dead,” Gilles notes. “A lamb often represents a child.  Scrolls represent life and time unfolding. Open books can represent the bible or the “book of life.”

 
The Porte-cochere, designed by renowned Toronto architect Henry Langley and part of the Toronto Necropolis, shows some of the elaborate decorative style of this Cabagetown landmark, Joe Rozman of Weenen General Contracting Limited points out that the Weenen offices on Carlton Street, are located in a building that has history too – it dates back to 1862.  “We are committed to preserving our part of Cabbagetown’s important history,” he says.  “There are so many fascinating spots here– they make this a vibrant neighbourhood, and who knows, the new buildings from 2018 may be part of a heritage movement in the year 2118!”

TwitterGoogle+FacebookLinkedInDiggStumbleUponBlogger PostDeliciousShare

Other News

duncan_PSNews-ad

Message From Duncan Fremlin

Friends:  Despite the fact that the Provincial Government deemed real estate an essential service, for the vast majority of us, trading in real estate is not on our "essential" list anytime soon.  … [Read More...]

650Parliament-1

650 Parliament, Welcome Back!

Contributed by Brian Simpson.  On March 2 nd, as I headed off to work, I noticed a moving van pulling into 650 Parliament St. But there had been trucks coming and going there for well over a year, … [Read More...]

weenan-general

Weenen General Contracting

Originally published in the Fall 2011 edition of the Parliament Street News. (Sadly, David Weenen passed away, not long after this article, in the fall of 2011). The Victorians may have kept their … [Read More...]

s0372_ss0041_it0809 Eclipse Theatre 1949

The History of Parliament Street

Originally contributed to our original issue of the Parliament Street news by Nora Ottaway, On behalf of the Cabbagetown Regent Park Musem. Named after legislative buildings later burned to the … [Read More...]

New decade, New year…

Contributed by Sarah Cook- Publisher.  New goals and adventures, and new opportunities!   Do you make “New Years resolutions”? Do you keep your new pledges to yourself? Or do you tell all … [Read More...]

cover-pstreet-news

TEN YEARS AGO! AN OVERNIGHT SUCCESS

Contributed by Pete Lovering. It started as a quasi grassroots business/art experiment over ten years ago. It also started as part of a theory that the internet had coopted the concept of community. … [Read More...]

weenen-general

Embrace Change in the New Decade!

Contributed by Kathy Flaxman. If your home could speak, what would it say? How about: “I want to stay flexible to explore my potential!”   According to Cabbagetown-based architect Monica … [Read More...]